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Place to Place

 

Exhibit: Friday, 17 February - 15 April, 2017 

Opening Reception: Friday, 17 February 2017 from 7:00pm - 10:00pm

Artist Talk: Friday 7, April 2017 at 7:00pm

 

de stijl | PODIUM FOR ART is pleased to present Place to Place, an exhibition of recent paintings, sculptures, and works on paper by San Antonio-based artist Larry Graeber.

Each of Larry Graeber’s works is a resolution of two competing tendencies—an intuitively curious exploration of materials and a deliberate approach to composition. As a result, the works on view in Place to Place are both individual environments and related instances of the artist’s approach. Graeber’s works steadily weave between subjective depictions and pure abstraction.

Heavily influenced by architecture and design, Graeber’s compositions can be described as improvisations within a set structure. He references the art-historical traditions of formal abstraction while maintaining an informal approach to material treatment. Taking clues from Constructivism, Graeber's paintings, sculptures, and works on paper remain sincere to their materials. Referencing our contemporary digital age, his works are often reworked—layering over one impulse with another.

Larry Graeber lives and works in San Antonio. He attended Texas State University (then Southwest Texas State University) and audited many fine art studio courses in San Antonio, but is otherwise self-taught. Graeber’s work is included in many public and private collections. His work has been included in numerous solo and group exhibitions since 1971, including the inaugural exhibition at Blue Star Art, Contemporary Art for San Antonio, in 1986. He is included in Texas Abstract, Modern/Contemporary, a historical survey of the abstract movement in Texas by Michael Paglia and Jim Edwards.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with an essay by art critic and curator Chad Dawkins. For further information, please contact de stijl | PODIUM FOR ART at destijlaustin@gmail.com or 512 354-0868. 

 

     Before I Knew You, I Missed You

 

     Exhibit: Saturday, 24 September - 26 November, 2016

                                                                       Opening Reception: Saturday, 24 September 2016 from 7:00pm - 10:00pm

                                                                                           Artist Talk: Friday, 18 November 2016 at 8:30pm    

 

de stijl | PODIUM FOR ART is pleased to present Before I Knew You, I Missed You, a solo exhibition of new work by sculptor Tammie Rubin. Mining familiar forms to construct intricate porcelain sculptures, Rubin explores the mysteries of the recognizable, decontextualized. Certain forms, she proposes, are imbued with power and manifest themselves at unexpected historical junctures. Somewhere between the readymade and the intricately hand-made, Rubin draws out how and why we find ourselves connecting to--and repeatedly communicating with--these forms.

In past works, Rubin has used dynamic color combinations and brightly intricate surfaces to heighten the surreal effects with which she works. For Before I Knew You, I Missed You, she pares down her palette--using mostly black, blue, and white--and the effect is sobering. These evocative compositions are gathered in groups that seem to speak together: a collection of black funnels, for example, have oval, rectangular, and rounded slits where eyes might peer out of them as they congregate. What's behind the surfaces, beneath these mask-like exteriors, is the unnerving question. The intimate scale of the works and their placement in groups compel a certain sensory response and proximity; the objects need each other, riff off each other, and simultaneously invite the viewer to imagine what might happen next, in these suspended spaces between the familiar and the unpredictable.

In this newest body of work, Rubin also references The Great Migration in the U.S. The surface treatments of the sculptures draw from maps of the migrations that many black Southerners (including Rubin’s parents) made in search of better economic and social opportunities in Northern cities between the 1910s and early 1970s. Her surfaces trace some of these routes, but as she abstracts them they become amorphous, layered impressions of migratory paths--they subtly hint at historical and personal memories of travel, uncertainty, and hope.

Rubin received her MFA in Ceramics from the University of Washington in Seattle. She has had solo exhibitions at Lipscomb University, Nashville, TN; Berea College, Berea, KY; The William & Florence Schmidt Arts Center, Belleville, IL; The Gallery at Penn College, Pennsylvania College of Technology, Williamsport, PA; Lone Star College-North Harris, Houston, TX; Missouri Southern State University, Joplin, MO; Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD; Indianapolis Art Center, Indianapolis, IN; and The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS; among other galleries and museums. She is Assistant Professor of Sculpture and Ceramics at St. Edwards University in Austin. This is Rubin's first exhibition in Austin, TX.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a printed catalog. Fully illustrated, the catalog will feature an essay by Guatemala City-based writer and curator Laura A. L. Wellen, PhD. 

 

One / Sixth

Exhibit:  Friday, 13 May 2016 - extended until August 13th, 2016

Opening Reception:  Friday, 13 May 2016 from 7:00pm - 10:00pm

Artists Discussion:  Sunday, 15 May 2016 from 2:00pm

 

Walter Kisner, 1982 MFA 

Steven Jones, 1990 MFA 

Zoe Charlton, 1999 MFA 

Robert Pruitt, 2003 MFA 

Christina Coleman, 2012 MFA 

Janaye Brown, 2013 MFA 

 

de stijl | PODIUM FOR ART is proud to present One / Sixth, which features work by the six black alumni of the University of Texas at Austin’s Masters of Fine Arts program.  The fraction one-sixth can imply the measurement of time and space.  This seemingly insignificant numeric also gestures toward a noteworthy, fractional state of diversity and inclusion.  The exhibition One / Sixth offers a visual tenor that highlights shades, cadences, and durations of temporality writ large.  Here, the schism between the myths of linear progress in society and education, and the challenges of cultural exclusion and its attendant circular sense of time has amounted to One / Sixth.

In unique ways, the respective works of these six artists explore time in various media and contexts. Janaye Brown’s “pro-filmic” videos capture and transform mundane phenomena into meditative moments that encourage mindfulness on the viewer’s part, reducing the velocity of modern life and its constant flow of images.  Christina Coleman’s sculptures of synthetic hair, which heavily signify race, and Walter Kisner’s collages, which ponder the musical qualities of abstraction, both painstakingly adopt the time- and hand-intensive traditions of craft.  Robert Pruitt’s portraits of family and friends evoke Afrofuturism, as they richly borrow material from popular science fiction, comic books, and black revolutionary cultures.  Zoë Charlton’s fantastical drawings of racial subjects meld portraits into landscapes, illustrating a variety of alienations, mutations, and voyeurisms that precipitate intersectional identities.  Steven Jones’ sculptures have evolved from drawings on maps and mosaic processes, which evoke a measure of time and meditation.

In addition, a printed catalog supplements One / Sixth.  Fully illustrated with works from the show, the catalog features critical essays written by cultural critic and doctoral candidate, Jared Richardson. 

To order, click here. 

UPDATE

On May 9th, we learned that Wendel A. White earned his MFA at UT as well.  He graduated in 1982.  He should have been included in our endeavors and we would have enjoyed incorporating his art into this exhibition.  Mr. White is a successful photographer and Distinguished Professor of Art at the School of Arts & Humanities at Stockton University in New Jersey. He is currently working on a project at the Smithsonian.  We have apologized to Mr. White and also want to extend this apology to anyone else affected by our omission.

Some of Mr. White's work includes:

The Manifest project.  An effort to seek out the cultural artifacts of the American concepts and representation of race.  The histories of slavery, abolition, segregation, the U.S. Civil War, and the Civil Rights Era are a few of the narratives that emerge in these photographs.  A recent book based on this work was published by Chroma (California Institute for Integral Studies, San Francisco, CA.), available on their website and from Photo-Eye Bookstore.

Schools for the Colored.   The architecture and geography of America's educational apartheid, in the form of a system of "colored schools", within the landscape of southern New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, is the central concern of this project.

7 Steps to Freedom.  A commissioned public art project for the Salem County Cultural & Heritage Commission, tells stories about the struggle against slavery from different points of view, including a Quaker abolitionist, Civil War soldiers, a young African American girl who became a poet and a conductor on the Underground Railroad.

Small Towns, Black Lives.  This exhibition, catalogue and multimedia web based presentation includes photography, text, archival documents, video and audio materials. Spanning the attention of this artist for more than 12 years, the project started with a 1989 visit to a historically African American settlement knows as Whitesboro, New Jersey.

Village of Peace: Photographs of the African Hebrew Israelite community of Dimona, Israel, established more than 35 years ago by a group of African Americans from the Chicago area.

 For those interested in more about Mr. White's work, we direct you to his website: www.wendelwhite.com.